Today is a good day I think to

talk to me cause people are fascinating!   submit ;)   I'm Beth, 18, 5w4, humanist, pansexual, happily taken, usa | aspiring renaissance human hoping to explore, enjoy, and change the world as much as possible til it kicks me out

sleepy-running:

I’m having so much fun, though I spent a lot of time sleeping because I keep getting so weak and tired. Spent most of the days on my own, talking to strangers, giving strangers drawings, walking around and when I did go back into the room I had almost no anxiety.

This was honestly the best con experience I’ve had. Gifts for people.

I was the girl in the puffy skirt and your drawing made my day! (:

— 2 months ago with 4 notes
thedelicatedaffodil:

skippydips:

eatingcroutons:

fluffmugger:

deathrayglare:

A layer of human skin made from stem cells by a 3d printer

Guys, this is SO MUCH HUGER than this image.  They actually have systems under development that can print directly into a wound.

 The bioprinter has a built-in laser scanner that scans the wound and determines its depth and area. The scan is converted into three-dimensional digital images that enable the device to calculate how many layers of skin cells need to be printed on the wound to restore it to its original configuration. The system has successfully printed skin patches 10 cm square on a pig

http://www.zeitnews.org/node/974
Ten years. that’s how long they reckon until this is commonplace.  Ten years. 

And that article is two and a half years old! Check out what they can do now:
3D printer makes tiniest human liver ever 

They’ve grown a working human bladder and a small kidney, too, this shit’s game-changing

Guys pay attention this is IMMENSE


HUN I TOLD YOU OMGSHHHSCIENCE

thedelicatedaffodil:

skippydips:

eatingcroutons:

fluffmugger:

deathrayglare:

A layer of human skin made from stem cells by a 3d printer

Guys, this is SO MUCH HUGER than this image.  They actually have systems under development that can print directly into a wound.


The bioprinter has a built-in laser scanner that scans the wound and determines its depth and area. The scan is converted into three-dimensional digital images that enable the device to calculate how many layers of skin cells need to be printed on the wound to restore it to its original configuration. The system has successfully printed skin patches 10 cm square on a pig

http://www.zeitnews.org/node/974

Ten years. that’s how long they reckon until this is commonplace.  Ten years.

And that article is two and a half years old! Check out what they can do now:

3D printer makes tiniest human liver ever

They’ve grown a working human bladder and a small kidney, too, this shit’s game-changing

Guys pay attention this is IMMENSE

HUN I TOLD YOU OMGSHHH

SCIENCE

(via princeofclockwork)

— 2 months ago with 135127 notes
#princeofclockwork 
"Why should society feel responsible only for the education of children, and not for the education of all adults of every age?"
Erich Fromm (via thescienceofreality)
— 3 months ago with 416 notes

lordoftheinternet:

there is actually nothing worse than the prices of plane tickets

(via nefariousnick)

— 3 months ago with 197390 notes

prettyinporcelain:

living-corpse:

copequinn:

nicotinehearts:

omigawdmatt:

racheyzane:

do you ever look at somebody and wonder how they moan during sex

no but thanks now i have a new habit forced upon me whenever i go out

i think about this post at the most inappropriate times and it has ruined my life

Guys lips are the same color as the tip of their penis have fun with that fact at bad times

eyebrow hair is usually the colour of one’s pubes HAVE FUN

I hate you all so much

(via nefariousnick)

— 3 months ago with 614694 notes
"The world didn’t get worse, homie, your eyes just got wider."
fuckin deep ass top comment on youtube  (via artistsuffer)

(Source: cas-wants-the-dean, via haildaftpunk)

— 3 months ago with 264060 notes
"I’d love to see more books where the characters get together earlier in the story. While the yearning portions of books are lovely and make us flip their pages, I’d love to see more stories where healthy romantic relationships are depicted. Where the curtain isn’t dropped with the suggestion of coupling up = happily ever after. Novels that take us past that point and depict a young couple working out some of their early insecurities and issues; that show us the romance and heartache of settling into a relationship. Like the moment when you’ve hung up on your boyfriend/girlfriend for the first time and you’re cradling your phone, praying they’ll know you want them to call back. Or you’ve slammed a door and you hope they’re waiting on the other side figuring out the perfect words to transform the emotions inside you from anger and hurt to comfort and passion.
Relationships are not a destination. They’re not an end-point. They’re always a journey. They should always be challenging and growing and evolving."
Tiffany Schmidt, on what makes for a good contemporary romance in YA fiction. She also offers up an excellent reading list of current and forthcoming contemporary novels with well-done romances for YA fiction fans.   (via yahighway)

(Source: catagator, via lalondes)

— 3 months ago with 19640 notes
http://translexual.tumblr.com/post/70805387500/girljanitor-quixotess-smallapplegoat →

girljanitor:

quixotess:

smallapplegoat:

cupcakeinatorellie:

denyselfandfollowchrist:

cupcakeinatorellie:

Hey

Psstt

The guy who invented the theory that vaccines cause autism had his medical license revoked for it

thats ridiculous

they took it away…

— 3 months ago with 35703 notes

paralovemore:

Ain’t it fun living in the real world?

(via l-esbian)

— 3 months ago with 950 notes

lapetitemangue:

Yayoi Kusama’s “Fireflies on the Water” light installation at the Whitney Museum, 2012. Photos taken by Gabrielle Plucknette and are owned by the New York Times.

(Source: The New York Times, via merelyimaginary)

— 3 months ago with 90908 notes
"It was one of those moments
that is the opposite of blindness.
The world poured back and forth between their eyes once or twice."
Anne Carson, “Autobiography of Red” (via lalondes)

(via merelyimaginary)

— 3 months ago with 28 notes
wildcat2030:

Dolphins ‘deliberately get high’ on puffer fish nerve toxins by carefully chewing and passing them around 
Dolphins are thought of as one of the most intelligent species in the animal kingdom – and experts believe they have put their ingenuity to use in the pursuit of getting “high”. In extraordinary scenes filmed for a new documentary, young dolphins were seen carefully manipulating a certain kind of puffer fish which, if provoked, releases a nerve toxin. Though large doses of the toxin can be deadly, in small amounts it is known to produce a narcotic effect, and the dolphins appeared to have worked out how to make the fish release just the right amount. Carefully chewing on the puffer and passing it between one another, the marine mammals then enter what seems to be a trance-like state. The behaviour was captured on camera by the makers of Dolphins: Spy in the Pod, a series produced for BBC One by the award-winning wildlife documentary producer John Downer. Rob Pilley, a zoologist who also worked as a producer on the series, told the Sunday Times: “This was a case of young dolphins purposely experimenting with something we know to be intoxicating. “After chewing the puffer gently and passing it round, they began acting most peculiarly, hanging around with their noses at the surface as if fascinated by their own reflection. “It reminded us of that craze a few years ago when people started licking toads to get a buzz, especially the way they hung there in a daze afterwards. It was the most extraordinary thing to see.” (via Dolphins ‘deliberately get high’ on puffer fish nerve toxins by carefully chewing and passing them around - Nature - Environment - The Independent)

wildcat2030:

Dolphins ‘deliberately get high’ on puffer fish nerve toxins by carefully chewing and passing them around

Dolphins are thought of as one of the most intelligent species in the animal kingdom – and experts believe they have put their ingenuity to use in the pursuit of getting “high”. In extraordinary scenes filmed for a new documentary, young dolphins were seen carefully manipulating a certain kind of puffer fish which, if provoked, releases a nerve toxin. Though large doses of the toxin can be deadly, in small amounts it is known to produce a narcotic effect, and the dolphins appeared to have worked out how to make the fish release just the right amount. Carefully chewing on the puffer and passing it between one another, the marine mammals then enter what seems to be a trance-like state. The behaviour was captured on camera by the makers of Dolphins: Spy in the Pod, a series produced for BBC One by the award-winning wildlife documentary producer John Downer. Rob Pilley, a zoologist who also worked as a producer on the series, told the Sunday Times: “This was a case of young dolphins purposely experimenting with something we know to be intoxicating. “After chewing the puffer gently and passing it round, they began acting most peculiarly, hanging around with their noses at the surface as if fascinated by their own reflection. “It reminded us of that craze a few years ago when people started licking toads to get a buzz, especially the way they hung there in a daze afterwards. It was the most extraordinary thing to see.” (via Dolphins ‘deliberately get high’ on puffer fish nerve toxins by carefully chewing and passing them around - Nature - Environment - The Independent)

— 3 months ago with 299 notes